Ramblings of Daniel Graziotin

Announcing rchive.it

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I am glad to announce the public availability of rchiveit, a Web application with the aim to quickly deliver the answer to the question

What am I allowed to do with my scientific paper?

Three days ago, I played with Bootstrap for the first time. Yes, I have background in Web Engineering but I have never played with Bootstrap before.
However, in addition to play around with some CSS and JavaScript, I also wished to do a little contribution for Open Science, Open Access in particular.

While Open Access begins to be well known and widely adopted in Life Sciences, I could perceive this is not the case for Computer Science. Especially, I deal with many researchers in Software Engineering and Information Systems. The majority of them do not even know that they can self-archive their papers.
Even worse, most of those who aware of self-archiving blatantly admit that they do not have the time to understand whether they are allowed or not to do that. Therefore, they don’t self-archive. Sure, publisher’s copyright transfer agreements are long, tedious and difficult to understand. For this reason, SHERPA/RoMEO was born. SHERPA/RoMEO collects and lists publishers’ copyright agreements & retained author rights. Unfortunately, its outdated interface still offers too many details. Scientists need a fresh website that delivers a strong, immediate message. Therefore, I developed rchiveit.

rchiveit

rchiveit is a Web applications, which is nothing else than a wrapper for SHERPA/RoMEO service. Indeed, it uses SHERPA/RoMEO API.

Researchers input the name of the journal or the conference proceedings book in rchiveit. The system looks in SHERPA/RoMEO database, eventually help to disambiguate the given text, and then deliver an icon-based answer, in a 4+1 View of green Open Access.

rchiveit main window
rchiveit main window

This is what researchers see if preprinting is not allowed.

rchiveit reports a publisher  allowing self-archiving of preprints.
rchiveit reports a publisher allowing self-archiving of preprints.

On the other hand, this is what researchers see if preprinting is not allowed:

rchiveit reports a publisher not allowing self-archiving of preprints.
rchiveit reports a publisher not allowing self-archiving of preprints.

In addition to listing the preprint permissions in a straightforward way, rchiveit already suggests where to upload them. Unfamiliar names such as self-archiving, preprint, and postprint have associated explanations that appear on mouse hover. Where possible, Wikipedia links are also provided.

As publishers often impose limitations and general conditions to the granted rights, rchiveit presents them after the permissions.

The fourth and the +1 views of rchive it: the additional conditions under which the permissions are given and the additional information.
The fourth and the +1 views of rchive it: the additional conditions under which the permissions are given and the additional information.

An rchiveit entry somehow mimics a Creative Commons page. It strives to deliver the most essential information with the links to expand the knowledge, if needed.

rchiveit is how I imagine a better SHERPA/RoMEO to be. But it is far from being perfect. I kindly ask the scientific / technological community to spread the tool but also to contribute to the project. Every small help counts, even correcting the English of the Why self-archiving a paper? section.

Thank you!

About the author

dgraziotin

Dr. Daniel Graziotin received his PhD in computer science, software engineering at the Free University of Bozen-Bolzano, Italy. His research interests include human aspects in empirical software engineering with psychological measurements, Web engineering, and open science. He researches, publishes, and reviews for venues in software engineering, human-computer interaction, and psychology. Daniel is the founder of the psychoempirical software engineering discipline and guidelines. He is associate editor at the Journal of Open Research Software, academic editor at the Research Ideas and Outcomes (RIO) journal, and academic editor at the Open Communications in Computer Science journal. He is the local coordinator of the Italian Open science local group for the Open Knowledge Foundation. He is a member of ACM, SIGSOFT, and IEEE.

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By dgraziotin
Ramblings of Daniel Graziotin

About Author

dgraziotin

Dr. Daniel Graziotin received his PhD in computer science, software engineering at the Free University of Bozen-Bolzano, Italy. His research interests include human aspects in empirical software engineering with psychological measurements, Web engineering, and open science. He researches, publishes, and reviews for venues in software engineering, human-computer interaction, and psychology. Daniel is the founder of the psychoempirical software engineering discipline and guidelines. He is associate editor at the Journal of Open Research Software, academic editor at the Research Ideas and Outcomes (RIO) journal, and academic editor at the Open Communications in Computer Science journal. He is the local coordinator of the Italian Open science local group for the Open Knowledge Foundation. He is a member of ACM, SIGSOFT, and IEEE.

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