Ramblings of Daniel Graziotin

Categoryannouncements

Announcing rchive.it

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I am glad to announce the public availability of rchiveit, a Web application with the aim to quickly deliver the answer to the question What am I allowed to do with my scientific paper? Three days ago, I played with Bootstrap for the first time. Yes, I have background in Web Engineering but I have never played with Bootstrap before. However, in addition to play around with some CSS and...

[CfP] Special Issue “Challenges in Open Access Publishing for Software Engineering and Information Systems Fields”

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I am glad to have been invited as a guest editor for the Open Access Challenges journal. The special issue is entitled Challenges in Open Access Publishing for Software Engineering and Information Systems Fields. Although Open Access is gaining momentum in natural and life sciences, the current status of Open Access in the fields of Software Engineering and Information Systems is mostly unknown...

1st Software Factory Evening

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Similarly to the Entrepreneurship Evening, we are organizing a show-off event for the end of this year’s Software Factory course. Software Factory is a special course at the Faculty of Computer Science, Free University of Bozen/Bolzano, in which students coming from all University Faculties develop a working software prototype for an existing customer. The course lasts only 7 weeks and is...

Introducing SEMAT Essence Accelerator

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It is a pleasure for me to announce a stable public release of SematAcc – the SEMAT Essence Accelerator. SematAcc is a web positioning system for SEMAT Essence Theory of Software Engineering. It provides practical ways to learn the Essence theory, as it enables a web positioning system to represent a software system status using Essence Kernel (currently, only the Concerns, Alphas and the...

Migrating to a new Server

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I am currently migrating ineed.coffee website to a new server. Expect some up-and-down due to DNS changes. The website should completely be OK tomorrow (2013-02-03).
Other stuff will also be moved in the subsequent days. I expect some other up-and-down during the next week, due to me doing dumb stuff with configuration files.
(Featured Image credits: USFWS)

2nd Free University of Bozen-Bolzano Entrepreneurship Evening

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I am pleased to invite my readers to the second edition of FUBEE, the Entrepreneurship Evening event of the Free University of Bozen-Bolzano (FUB). WHAT FUBEE is organized during the Lean Startup course, which is the first course truly opened to all FUB faculties and students.It is a taste of the future of young Entrepreneurs in South Tyrol (Italy). Each of the student team delivers an executive...

Mbpfan v1.5.0 is out. Supports true multicore CPUs

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Mbpfan v1.5.0 is out! This release adds compatibility with 3.5-3.6 kernels and true multicore CPUs. That is, all Intel based Macbooks should be supported. I am using mbpfan on my Macbook Pro 6,2 on Ubuntu 12.10 successfully. This time, I could find the very kind collaboration of two Archlinux users, to make the necessary changes to mbpfan. This means that mbpfan has been successfully tested on...

Announcing mbpfan v1.4.1

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I’ve finally found the time to fix some annoying issues in mbpfan. I have just released mbpfan version 1.4.1, which is a maintenance release. I strongly recommend our testers to upgrade. This release fixes a strange fork bomb-like behavior when starting mbpfan using upstart. Also, the daemon now checks whether the required modules coretemp and applesmc are loaded or not. It also checks for...

mbpfan v1.4.0 is out

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It is a pleasure for me to announce the immediate availability of mbpfan version 1.4.0. The project attempt is to write a simple, lightweight, yet highly efficient program to adjust the CPU and the other fans of Macbook and Macbook Pro laptops running GNU/Linux. This project could not accept its destiny to be a insignificant, C refresh task. Instead, mbpfan rapidly captivated the attention of the...

OpenPomo development has stopped

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Time to admit it. I do not have the time to continue the development of OpenPomo. It has been funny to start the (probably) first non-trivial Pomodoro Android project ever. OpenPomo development started on October 2009 as a University project, under the name Pomodroid. I don’t even remember when it was first released to the public, as opensource software. My commitment to the project has...

Announcing mbpfan v1.3.0

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It is a pleasure for me to announce the availability of mbpfan (Fan-Control-Daemon) v1.3.0. This version follows the initial public release. Version 1.3.0 adds many enhancements. Among them, it now runs as an Ubuntu/Debian daemon. Additionally, CeRiAl added support for Fedora/RedHat systems. Mbpfan also correctly uses manual control of the fans and provides unittests. Check it out at the new...

An enhanced version of Simple MacBook Pro Fan Daemon for Linux

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I wanted to refresh my C knowledge. At the same time, I was complaining about how much macfanctld aggressively turns the fans of my Macbook Pro under Ubuntu 12.04. Sometimes I am afraid it is going to lift-off. I took the occasion to give a small contribution to a small opensource project, written in C. Allan McRae’s mbpfan uses a very interesting approach to control the fans, based on the...

OpenPomo Project is born

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After more than a year, I am very happy to announce that Pomodroid – the first Android advanced productivity app that lets user focus on their tasks under the Pomodoro Technique – has been discontinued. From the ashes of Pomodroid, the OpenPomo project is born. OpenPomo is a family of Android applications, all of them opensource, implementing the Pomodoro Technique. Right now...

New FranzMagazine website is online!

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After 4 months of development, cooperation with the graphics designer, hundreds of emails with the customers and many meetings, the new Franz Magazine website is online. It has been such a slow process, mostly because nobody of us could work on it full-time. The website is ready and features so many functionalities. Some bugs may still be present, some graphic contents may still be missing, but...

DataDeck v0.4.0 – Creation, modification and organization of Packages

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A new DataDeck version is out. In DataDeck v0.4.0 I implemented quite all the additions I developed in dpm library. In this release I focused on packages. Because DataDeck searches and downloads packages from The Data Hub, it makes sense to have those packages organized and easily managed. Therefore, DataDeck now has a Package Library (or a local workspace): . The Library provides a unique and...

Announcing DataDeck v0.3.3, huge refactoring and many bugs fixed

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I could not call it v0.4.0 because I did not really add new functionalities since v0.3.2. But take a look at the GitHub compare of v0.3.2 and v0.3.3. A total of 11 commits, showing 21 changed files with 3,605 additions and 1,740 deletions. Not bad for a one-man, ~1300 LOC sized project (still have to figure it out). So why am I posting about this release? Because I am pretty proud of it. In this...

Announcing DataDeck v0.3.1

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Finally, I was able to work on DataDeck and release version 0.3.1 to the public. During the last 10 days I favored working on the new dpm library. It is difficult for me to contribute to both the projects because DataDeck is completely dpm dependent. Meanwhile, dpm is facing many internal changes. It is switching from a manager for open knowledge packages to a git-styled manager to...

Ramblings of Daniel Graziotin

About Author

dgraziotin

Dr. Daniel Graziotin received his PhD in computer science, software engineering at the Free University of Bozen-Bolzano, Italy. His research interests include human aspects in empirical software engineering with psychological measurements, Web engineering, and open science. He researches, publishes, and reviews for venues in software engineering, human-computer interaction, and psychology. Daniel is the founder of the psychoempirical software engineering discipline and guidelines. He is associate editor at the Journal of Open Research Software, academic editor at the Research Ideas and Outcomes (RIO) journal, and academic editor at the Open Communications in Computer Science journal. He is the local coordinator of the Italian Open science local group for the Open Knowledge Foundation. He is a member of ACM, SIGSOFT, and IEEE.