Ramblings of Daniel Graziotin

rchiveit

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Introduction

rchiveit is a Web tool to spread the awareness and the practice of self-archiving / green Open Access among scientists, especially those in Computer Science (Software Engineering and Information Systems).

Green Open Access. Taken from http://www.clarifyscience.info/
Green Open Access.
Taken from http://www.clarifyscience.info/

Scientists input the name of the journal / proceedings book in a text box. rchive it employs SHERPA/RoMEO API to retrieve the relevant entry and to present it to the user.

rchiveit main window
rchiveit main window

What is the different between rchive it and SHERPA/RoMEO? rchive it is nothing else than a wrapper around SHERPA/RoMEO but differences happen in how the data is presented. rchive it purposely presents less information then SHERPA/RoMEO, in order to provide only what is needed for answering this question:

What am I allowed to do with my scientific paper?

The 4+1 View of green Open Access

The Web application answers the question with a 4 + 1 view of green Open Accesss

The first three squares of the 4+1 view of rchive it: the permissions given by the publisher.
The first three squares of the 4+1 view of rchive it: the permissions given by the publisher.

The first three squares summarize what the scientist can do with the preprint, the postprint, and the publisher PDF of the scientific article. The permission is summarized with an icon (i.e., a Font Awesome) and a short sentence, which briefly states if the scientist is allowed to self-archive the paper.

The fourth and the +1 views of rchive it: the additional conditions under which the permissions are given and the additional information.
The fourth and the +1 views of rchive it: the additional conditions under which the permissions are given and the additional information.

The fourth square provides the additional conditions that may be added by a publisher.

The fifth (+1) square provides links for additional information. The first link is always the SHERPA/RoMEO entry of the journal. The other links are mostly to copyright policies of the publisher.

Additionally, SHERPA/RoMEO has got an outdated, not responsive interface, that is instead provided by rchiveit.

rchiveit was indeed developed as a way to reinvent SHERPA/RoMEO.

Download

Although rchiveit is live and running at http://rchive.it, everybody is free to obtain its source-code.
Visit rchiveit GitHub page.

Contribute

There are several ways to contribute to rchiveit.

Report Issues

Head to the issue tracker or drop me a mail: graziotin AT inf DOT unibz DOT it

Fix Issues

Head to rchiveit GitHub page, clone and pull!

Suggest Enhancements

Head to the issue tracker or drop me a mail: graziotin AT inf DOT unibz DOT it

Provide Enhancements

Head to rchiveit GitHub page, clone and pull!

rchiveit welcomes all kind of contributions. Are you a frontend/JS developer? A backend/PHP coder? A UX expert? A graphics designer? An advocate of Open Access? A native English speaker? You are welcome.

So far, rchiveit needs:

  • Bug Fixes
  • Performance enhancements
  • Proof-read
  • Section (text) rewriting
  • Graphics and layout enhancements
  • Usability enhancements

License

rchiveit is Open-Source software, available on GitHub and released under the BSD 3-Clause License.

Ramblings of Daniel Graziotin

About Author

dgraziotin

Dr. Daniel Graziotin received his PhD in computer science, software engineering at the Free University of Bozen-Bolzano, Italy. His research interests include human aspects in empirical software engineering with psychological measurements, Web engineering, and open science. He researches, publishes, and reviews for venues in software engineering, human-computer interaction, and psychology. Daniel is the founder of the psychoempirical software engineering discipline and guidelines. He is associate editor at the Journal of Open Research Software, academic editor at the Research Ideas and Outcomes (RIO) journal, and academic editor at the Open Communications in Computer Science journal. He is the local coordinator of the Italian Open science local group for the Open Knowledge Foundation. He is a member of ACM, SIGSOFT, and IEEE.

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